Mr. Cee Sets Hip-Hop Back With His Own Homophobia

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The first comment I came upon while researching Mr. Cee’s arrest for allegedly soliciting oral sex from a 20 year-old man was some dude writing about how most Black men are on the “down-low” because we’re raised by single mothers.

Great, I thought. I’m the product of a divorced single mother and though I’m yet to enjoy any homosexual hi-jinks, I guess it’s just a matter of time.

One thing I can promise you though – is that when I do finally get into guy-on-guy action – it won’t be out in public and it won’t be with an alleged male prostitute as Mr. Cee’s allegedly was. I’d like to think that I’m hot enough to get a guy that would give me some for free.

More seriously, here’s the most troubling thing about Mr. Cee’s arrest. If the incident happened as the police tell it, he felt he had to hide his proclivities by keeping them on darkened streetcorners, all the while engaging in the same “pause” talk that everyone else does. It points to something obvious and quite disturbing about hip hop culture—its rampant homophobia.

Why is hip hop’s homophobia disturbing?

Well, like Shakespeare’s famous quotation from Hamlet, “the lady doth protest too much,”which means literally, if you complain ad nauseam about something, you probably secretly enjoy it, hip hop’s gun-blazing anti-homosexuality makes it seem, well, gay.

Why so much concern over it if it doesn’t affect you, fellas?

Another factor to consider is the hyper-masculinity that rappers, as most Black men, seem to enjoy.

Well, this is a bogus myth that should be obvious from the door.

Would hyper-males have ever been enslaved?

Would hyper-males allow the females of their race to shoulder as much of the burden of carrying the race as Black men have?

Moreover, would hyper-males seem ecstatic to glorify the beauty and wonders of every other female except the females of their own race to the extent that Black men have?

No, no and no.

But I didn’t write all this to attack Black men. I’m a Black man myself and I love me some me.

What I’m saying in essence is that Black men, most specifically Black men in hip hop need to abandon homophobia and if not become homo-friendly, then at least become homo-indifferent because by not doing so, you’re making us all look suspect.

RELATED:

Popular NYC DJ Mr. Cee arrested for public lewdness

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