Top Ten Videos to watch

Kym Whitley
Pepsi Super Bowl 50 Halftime Show
Donald Trump's 'Crippled America' Book Press Conference
New Hampshire Primaries
TV One At The 47th NAACP Image Awards
Donald Trump Holds Rally In Biloxi, Mississippi
Behind bars
47th NAACP Image Awards Presented By TV One - Press Room
A Man Operating A Tv Camera
Maurice White
March2Justice
'News One Now' With Roland Martin Taping
Bill Cosby
Activists In Los Angeles Gather To Burn Likenesses Of The Confederate Flag
Flint Firebirds V Windsor Spitfires
CBC Message To America: Rep. Conyers Addresses The Damage Inflicted On Our Communities By Poverty, Mass Incarceration And Lack Of Economic Development
Iowa Caucus Ted Cruz
NewsOne Now NAACP Image Awards Preview
Student sitting at a desk in a classroom
Rahm Emanuel Announces Police Accountability Task Force As CPD Chief Is Fired
Slavery Stock image
The 16th Annual Wall Street Project Gala Fundraising Reception
Ava DuVernay
Roland Martin Blasts Stacey Dash For Comments About BET, Black Networks
President Obama Delivers State Of The Union Address At U.S. Capitol
Ava DuVernay
2016 North American International Auto Show
Democratic National Committee Presidential Primary Debate
88th Oscars Nominations Announcement
Leave a comment

recy taylorWASHINGTON — Recy Taylor has a picture of President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama in the living room of her home in Florida. She never imagined she would visit the Obamas’ house in Washington.

Taylor is touring the nation’s capital a month after her home state of Alabama apologized to her for never bringing to justice the men who were accused of kidnapping and assaulting her in the 1940s.

She took her first trip to Washington to attend a forum at the National Press Club about late civil rights activist Rosa Parks, who championed Taylor’s cause as a field caseworker with the NAACP.

In 1944, Taylor, who is black, was a 24-year-old wife and mother living in Abbeville, Ala. Seven white men kidnapped and sexually assaulted her and then left her on the side of a road. Two grand juries, made up of white men, refused to indict anyone.

The Associated Press does not typically identify victims of sexual assault but is using her name because she has publicly identified herself.

Last month, Alabama lawmakers offered Taylor, now 91, an apology for how her case was handled. Officials from her native Henry County and the mayor of Abbeville apologized to her in March.

Taylor didn’t see the Obamas during her White House tour Thursday but called the executive mansion “beautiful.” The Vermeil Room with its portraits of past first ladies was one of her favorites.

The nation’s capital is a contrast to Taylor’s hometown, a small southeast Alabama community.

“It’s a lot more to see than Abbeville,” she said, with a laugh. “Everything is different.”

Taylor traveled back to Abbeville last week to receive the state resolution of apology on Mother’s Day at Rock Hill Holiness Church. She had been walking from the church after service when she was kidnapped 67 years ago.

“That was a good day to present it to me,” she said. “I wasn’t expecting that. I didn’t know they was going to do it.”

Taylor said she keeps the resolution at home in a trunk with other special items. “I try to keep it where I won’t never lose it,” she said.

Mary Owens, Taylor’s granddaughter, accompanied her on the trip. She called Taylor a “hidden hero” and a “woman of integrity.”

“She has overcome,” Owens said.

RELATED STORIES

May Marks 50 Years Since Freedom Rides In South

David M. French, Physician and Civil Rights Activist, Dies At 86

Also On News One: