Top Ten Videos to watch

Hillary Clinton Meets With DC Mayor And DC Representative At Coffee Shop
crime scene
Vote
Studio Portrait of Two Young Women Back to Back, One With a Tattoo
Mamie Till and Emmett Till
GOP Redistricting Plot To Unseat Rep. Corrine Brown Exposed
Protests Break Out In Charlotte After Police Shooting
'Keep the Vote Alive!' March Commemorates Civil Rights Act
White man shooting
Gun Violence Continues To Plague Chicago, Over 1,000 Shootings For Year To Date
HS Football
Gun Violence Continues To Plague Chicago, Over 1,000 Shootings For Year To Date
Police Line
US-POLITICS-OBAMA
2016 Republican National Convention
44th NAACP Image Awards - Show
MD Primary
Premiere Of OWN's 'Queen Sugar' - Arrivals
Democratic National Convention
US-VOTE-REPUBLICANS-TRUMP
Los Angeles Rams v San Francisco 49ers
US-POLICE-RACISM-UNREST
Protesters Demonstrate Against Donald Trump's Visit To Flint Michigan
President Obama Speaks On The Economy In Brady Press Briefing Room
Lil Wayne
Construction Continues On The National Museum of African American History To Open In 2016
Preacher Preaching the Gospel
Hillary Clinton Campaigns In Louisville, Kentucky
Miami Dolphins v Seattle Seahawks
US-VOTE-DEMOCRATS-CONVENTION
Leave a comment

The Congressional Black Caucus is mostly known for its old guard of Black politicians.

But, like many organizations, a new crop of fresh, young members are taking over the CBC and trying to spread their message across all ages.

Check out some excerpts from a Washington Post article below on the new changes:

In January the newly assembled staff of the Congressional Black Caucus — executive director and general counsel Angela T. Rye, policy director E. Brandon Garrett, communications director Stephanie L. Young and executive assistant Latrice Powell — drove to Howard University to peruse the CBC archives. They wanted to research the 40-year-old organization they were now charged with representing, one founded long before any of them were born.

“We saw leaders who were instrumental in the anti-apartheid movement and imposing the trade embargo against South Africa,” Rye, 31, told The Root of the collection, which houses, among hundreds of other artifacts, a 1971 report on African-American issues prepared for the caucus by President Nixon and groovy-font copies of the For the People newsletter detailing their 1970s legislative agenda.

Read more at The Root

RELATED:

Check out our CBC coverage

Also On News One:
comments – Add Yours