Top Ten Videos to watch

Kym Whitley
Pepsi Super Bowl 50 Halftime Show
Donald Trump's 'Crippled America' Book Press Conference
New Hampshire Primaries
TV One At The 47th NAACP Image Awards
Donald Trump Holds Rally In Biloxi, Mississippi
Behind bars
47th NAACP Image Awards Presented By TV One - Press Room
A Man Operating A Tv Camera
Maurice White
March2Justice
'News One Now' With Roland Martin Taping
Bill Cosby
Activists In Los Angeles Gather To Burn Likenesses Of The Confederate Flag
Flint Firebirds V Windsor Spitfires
CBC Message To America: Rep. Conyers Addresses The Damage Inflicted On Our Communities By Poverty, Mass Incarceration And Lack Of Economic Development
Iowa Caucus Ted Cruz
NewsOne Now NAACP Image Awards Preview
Student sitting at a desk in a classroom
Rahm Emanuel Announces Police Accountability Task Force As CPD Chief Is Fired
Slavery Stock image
The 16th Annual Wall Street Project Gala Fundraising Reception
Ava DuVernay
Roland Martin Blasts Stacey Dash For Comments About BET, Black Networks
President Obama Delivers State Of The Union Address At U.S. Capitol
Ava DuVernay
2016 North American International Auto Show
Democratic National Committee Presidential Primary Debate
88th Oscars Nominations Announcement
Leave a comment

Nelson Mandela will not be attending the 100th anniversary of the African National Congress (ANC) due to health issues Voice of America reports.

SEE ALSO:

Why GOP Candidates Keep Talking Race

College Kids Boo Santorum

Party Secretary-General Gwede Mantashe announced Friday that Mandela will miss the activities saying, “he is in good spirits, but very, very old.”

It is expected, however, that Mandela will send a message to be read at the celebration.

The aging South African statesman, who turns 94 this year, is idolized by his countryman and considered the father of the anti-apartheid movement.  When Mandela was released in 1990 after 27 years of imprisonment, South Africans of all races looked to him to stop their nation from falling into a racial civil war. And he did.  Serving as the ANC president from 1994 to 1999, the Nobel Peace Prize winner’s focus was to bring peace to his people.  Under his leadership, a long list of progressive social reforms were enacted to reduce inequalities amongst the country’s black population.

The ANC celebration is expected to draw more than 100,000 people and more than 40 heads-of-state and dignitaries. Emeritus Arch-Bishop Desmond Tutu is expected to join Sunday’s festivities in Mangaung, Free State Province.  The party is said to be celebrating its core principles of allowing people to chose their own destiny in a “united, non-racial, non-sexist nation.”

Founded on January 8, 1912, the ANC has spiraled downward as far as its popularity.  Critics point out that the South African people are no longer the party’s focus and that corruption reigns supreme.

SEE ALSO:

Obama Refocuses Military

A Kennedy Will Run For Congress

Also On News One: