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cigarettes

Tobacco companies took a hit and have agreed to vocalize that they are deceiving the American public when it comes to the dangers of smoking; they have even agreed to run their own ads on television and print publications across the country. However, black media has been overwhelmingly left out.

The big tobacco companies, Altria, Reynolds American, and Lorillard, have agreed to spend $30 million in advertising across thrity-five White and Hispanic newspapers and websites. Cloves C. Campbell, chairman of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, spoke with “NewsOne Now,” and said that the exclusion of Black media shows that the Black community is continuing to be devalued.

“It’s a typical oversight of African-American business,” he said. “Again, as we continue to move into this new age of technology, it’s disappointing to see everyone else included except for Black media.”

Watch the entire discussion below:

“We clearly have to target our messages and make sure that kids are aware of the dangers of smoking,” said Brian Smedley, VP of the Health Policy Institute of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. “I’m afraid this is not enough. Much more needs to be done.”

“We have to make sure that we elevate this conversation,” said Melanie Campbell, president of the National Coalition on Black Civic Participation. “We need to let them know it’s not acceptable.”

Be sure to tune in to NewsOne Now with Roland Martin, weekdays at 7 a.m. EST.

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