Top Ten Videos to watch

Hillary Clinton Campaigns In Louisville, Kentucky
Worried black businesswoman at desk
Tyler Perry And Soledad O'Brien Host Gala Honoring Bishop T.D. Jakes' 35 Years Of Ministry
Teacher with group of preschoolers sitting at table
FBI Officials Discuss Apprehension Of Explosions Suspect After Three-Day Manhunt
NFC Championship - San Francisco 49ers v Atlanta Falcons
US-POLITICS-OBAMA
Protests Erupt In Chicago After Video Of Police Shooting Of Teen Is Released
24673281
US-VOTE-DEMOCRAT-SANDERS
Nine Dead After Church Shooting In Charleston
Portrait of senior African woman holding money
Medicare
President Bush Speals At Federalist Society's Gala
Police
Police Line Tape
Senior Woman's Hands
Police officers running
New Orleans Residents Return to Housing Projects
David Banner
2010 Jazz Interlude Gala
Couple Together on Sidewalk
US-VOTE-2012-ELECTION
Police
Serious decision
HIV Testing
Closing Arguments Held In Zimmerman Trial
Student Loan Application Form
Donald Trump in Nevada.
Hearing Held For Charleston Police Officer Who Shot And Killed Walter Scott
Leave a comment

Harvard doctors have coined the term “hood disease” to describe a complex form of post-traumatic stress syndrome threatening the well-being of inner-city youth, reports The Root.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 30 percent of U.S. inner-city youths are affected by the disorder, which makes it difficult for them to learn. Those who exhibit the disorder often live in virtual war zones, the CDC report says.

Doctors at Harvard recently coined the name “hood disease,” a term for a more complex form of PTSD, the news site reports. And since the youths rarely escape their communities—unlike soldiers who eventually leave a war zone—they are repeatedly exposed to trauma.

Pointing to the lack of food security, rampant violence and a culture of fear that permeates inner-cities across the country, San Francisco State University associate professor Jeff Duncan-Andrade told KPIX 5 that education is secondary to survival for these children.

“You could take anyone who is experiencing the symptoms of PTSD, and the things that we are currently emphasizing in school will fall off their radar,” said Duncan-Andrade. “Because, frankly, [schoolwork] does not matter in our biology if we don’t survive the walk home.”

Read more at The Root.

Also On News One: