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Screen Shot 2014-08-04 at 10.24.57 AM What you see above is a map of Detroit. The small colorful dots represent people, plotted to show where they live and their race. Whites are represented by blue dots, Blacks with green dots, Asians with red and Latinos with orange. All others are represented using the color brown. Again, what you see is Detroit, but also how tremendously segregated the city is by race. Wired.com got their hands on 20 images from a map created at the University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service. They show just how racially segregated many major American cities still are. From Wired:

The map, created by Dustin Cable at University of Virginia’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, is stunningly comprehensive. Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, it shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That’s 308,745,538 dots in all–around 7 GB of visual data. It isn’t the first map to show the country’s ethnic distribution, nor is it the first to show every single citizen, but it is the first to do both, making it the most comprehensive map of race in America ever created.

Responding to the Duke University study last year, experts were quick to expound on the complexities of the issue. Housing desegregation, one pointed out, is not a magic bullet for equal opportunity. Another made clear that blacks remained more segregated from whites than Latinos or Asians. Here, at least, Cable’s given us a chance to see how things stand today in greater detail than ever before.

You can check out the full, interactive map for yourself here to explore your city or head over to Wired.com to look at images of New York City, Atlanta, Los Angeles, Chicago, Birmingham, Dallas, New Orleans, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Sacramento, Omaha, Portland, St. Louis and Salt Lake City.

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