Leave a comment

Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a lion's share of delegates available to Democrats in the biggest single-day on the election calendar. Democrats voted in 11 states, plus American Samoa, with 865 delegates up for grabs. (March 2)

Updated: Wednesday, March 2, 2016 10 AM ET

Texas Republican Sen. Ted Cruz sealed his third Super Tuesday victory in Alaska, narrowly defeating Donald Trump, who was endorsed by the state’s former Gov. Sarah Palin, the Associated Press reported early Wednesday.

Cruz also won his home state and Oklahoma.

Despite the loss in Alaska, Trump had a Super Tuesday, winning seven states. Fla. Sen. Marco Rubio won Minnesota.

Watch Roland Martin and the NewsOne Now political panel break down Super Tuesday’s election results in the video clip below.

TV One’s NewsOne Now has moved to 7 A.M. ET, be sure to watch “NewsOne Now” with Roland Martin, in its new time slot on TV One.

Updated: Wednesday, March 2, 2016 12:25 AM ET

CNN reports that Donald Trump logged seven Super Tuesday win in the Arkansas and Vermont primaries, while Florida Sen. Marco Rubio secured his first victory in the Minnesota Republican caucuses.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is the projected winner of the Minnesota and Colorado Democratic caucuses, adding to wins in his home state and Oklahoma.

Clinton recorded her seventh win in the Massachusetts Democratic primary, and in American Samoa.

Officials were still sorting votes in the Alaska Republican caucuses.

Updated: Tuesday, March 1, 2016 10:11 PM ET

A subdued Donald Trump took to the stage at his campaign headquarters in Palm Beach, Florida, to celebrate primary wins in Arkansas, Massachusetts, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia and Virginia. He repeated his mantra to “Make America Great Again.”

“Amazing evening,” he said before congratulating Ted Cruz on his win in Texas, calling it “an excellent win.”

He slammed Clinton’s Super Tuesday speech, saying she’s not going to “make America whole again.”

Fielding questions from the media, he responded to a question about concerns expressed by House Speaker Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell about his failure to disavow support from former KKK leader David Duke, saying the controversy was stoked by the media.

“I disavow,” he said. “How many times do I have to say it?”

He went on to say he wants to unite the Republican Party.

“I am a unifier,” he said. “I would love to see the Republican Party unify. When we unify, there is no one who is going to beat us.”

He was introduced by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who called Trump’s candidacy a movement, not a campaign.

“Donald Trump is the clear winner of Super Tuesday,” Christie said. “Tonight is the beginning of Donald Trump bringing the Republican Party together for a victory in November.”

Updated: Tuesday, March 1, 2016 9:10 PM ET

Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton and Republican candidate Donald Trump both picked up early wins in several key states, according to surveys of voters as they left polls, reports CNN.

Clinton won early primary contests in Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Virginia, Texas, and Arkansas, where she once served as first lady. Democratic contender Bernie Sanders has won his home state of Vermont and Oklahoma.

Trump won primary races in Massachusetts, Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia and Virginia. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz won his home state and Oklahoma.

About 9 PM, Clinton delivered a celebratory stump speech at her campaign headquarters in South Florida, vowing to create new jobs and decried the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Supporters chanted “Hillary” as she entered the stage.

Updated: Tuesday, March 1, 2016 7:15 PM ET:

Based on early exit poll estimates, CNN projects Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and Republican rival Donald Trump will win Georgia. In projections that came after polls closed at 7 p.m. ET, Clinton is also expected to win the Virginia primary race.

Vermont Sen. and Democratic candidate Bernie Sanders is expected to win his home state, while Trump and Ohio Gov. John Kasich are locked in a dead heat in Vermont in the Republican race. The results also show that the Republican contest in Virginia is too close to call.

On Tuesday, voters in 12 states take to the polls, as Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton and her Republican rival Donald Trump work arduously to expand their delegate lead against the nearest challengers, according to The New York Times.

NewsOne reported Monday that Clinton and Trump held commanding leads ahead of Super Tuesday, when voters of both parties in Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont and Virginia go the polls or caucus. Democrats also caucus in Colorado, and Republicans will do the same in Alaska.

Trump is ahead among likely early Republican voters in Georgia and Tennessee, while rival Ted Cruz is out front in his home state of Texas, according to new polls from NBC News/Wall Street Journal/Marist.

Democratic presidential candidate and Vermont Senator, Bernie Sanders, vowed to stay in the race after a bruising defeat Saturday by Clinton in South Carolina’s primary race. Polls show Clinton leading Sanders in Georgia, Tennessee, and Texas by a margin of 2-to-1, reports NBC News.

Here’s what to watch for Tuesday night, according to CNN:

Trump is cruising nationally — with 49% support compared to Rubio’s 16% and Cruz’s 15% in a new CNN/ORC poll, giving him his largest lead yet.

He’s likely to blow out the competition in Massachusetts, Tennessee and Alabama, polls there show.

But it’s also possible Trump could win all 11 states — or come close to it. And if he does, it would leave other Republicans with very little hope of catching up.

Clinton could win among Black voters, reports The New York Times:

Mrs. Clinton won 87 percent of the black vote in South Carolina — a larger share than President Obama won in the 2008 primary — helping her win the state in a landslide, 73 percent to 26 percent for Senator Bernie Sanders.

If Mrs. Clinton were to repeat that performance on Tuesday, she could post similar victories in states like Georgia and Alabama. She could top 60 percent of the vote in other Southern states with large black populations, like Virginia, Texas, Tennessee and Arkansas.

Republican candidates are battling over 49 delegates, and 13 names will be on the ballot, although many have dropped out of the race, reports USA Today. Clinton and Sanders will fight for the largest share of 95 delegates:

Republican delegates will be awarded based on results in each of the state’s 11 congressional districts. Runners-up can pick up delegates based on their proportion of the vote in each congressional district.

Democratic delegates will be awarded based on results both by congressional district and statewide. The number of delegates at stake ranges from three in one southwestern Virginia district to eight in two Democratic-leaning districts represented by Democratic Reps. Bobby Scott and Don Beyer.

Check back here for live updates and the eventual winner of tonight’s races. 

SOURCE: The New York TimesNBC NewsToday | PHOTO CREDIT: Getty | VIDEO CREDIT: Inform 


TJMS/NewsOne Now Exclusive: Hillary Clinton Talks Black Women Entrepreneurs, Voting Rights, SCOTUS, & More

Clinton & Trump Lead Polls In Super Tuesday States; Black Dems Urge Obama To Nominate Loretta Lynch To Top Court

Also On News One:
comments – Add Yours