Top Ten Videos to watch

47th NAACP Image Awards Presented By TV One - Press Room
A Man Operating A Tv Camera
Maurice White
March2Justice
'News One Now' With Roland Martin Taping
Bill Cosby
Activists In Los Angeles Gather To Burn Likenesses Of The Confederate Flag
Flint Firebirds V Windsor Spitfires
CBC Message To America: Rep. Conyers Addresses The Damage Inflicted On Our Communities By Poverty, Mass Incarceration And Lack Of Economic Development
Iowa Caucus Ted Cruz
NewsOne Now NAACP Image Awards Preview
Student sitting at a desk in a classroom
Slavery Stock image
The 16th Annual Wall Street Project Gala Fundraising Reception
Ava DuVernay
Roland Martin Blasts Stacey Dash For Comments About BET, Black Networks
President Obama Delivers State Of The Union Address At U.S. Capitol
Ava DuVernay
2016 North American International Auto Show
Democratic National Committee Presidential Primary Debate
88th Oscars Nominations Announcement
Democratic debate
Dream Speech
GOP Presidential Candidates Debate In Charleston
US President Barack Obama speaks on the
24593149
2011 Winter TCA Tour - Day 5
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 18, 2015: Two wooden stand-in Oscar statuettes are ready to be taken on
Woman Holding Dollars - Isolated
Leave a comment

The Obama administration on Tuesday lifted the deep water oil drilling moratorium that the government imposed in the Gulf of Mexico in the wake of the disastrous BP oil spill.

deep-water-drilling

The administration has been under heavy pressure from the industry and others in the region to lift the six-month ban on grounds it has cost jobs and damaged the economy. A federal report said the moratorium likely caused a temporary loss of 8,000 to 12,000 jobs in the Gulf region.

While the temporary ban on exploratory oil and gas drilling is lifted immediately, drilling is unlikely to resume immediately. Drilling companies must meet a host of new safety regulations before they can resume operations, officials said.

Michael Bromwich, director of the agency that oversees offshore drilling, said it would take “at least a couple of weeks” after the ban is lifted before permits are approved.

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said that new rules imposed after the BP spill — the worst offshore oil spill in the nation’s history

have strengthened safety measures and reduced the risk of another catastrophic blowout.

“Operators who play by the rules and clear the higher bar can be allowed to resume” drilling, Salazar said at a news conference.

The secretary said he knows that some people in the oil industry and along the Gulf Coast will say the new rules are too onerous.

“Others will say that we are lifting the deep water drilling suspension too soon. They will say there are still risks involved with deep water drilling,” he said.

RELATED: Judge overturns Obama’s offshore drilling moratorium

The truth is, there will always be risks involved with deepwater drilling, Salazar said. “As we transition to a clean energy economy,” he added, “we will still need oil and gas from the Gulf of Mexico to power our homes, our cars, our industry.”

The new rules imposed by the administration will make oil and gas drilling in the Gulf “safer than it has ever been,” Salazar said.

Rep. Charlie Melancon, D-La., called the end of the drilling ban great news for Louisiana’s economy and workers.

Salazar emphasized that the move would include new requirements for those seeking to drill exploratory wells. Those entities and the companies they represent will have to prove they have the appropriate steps in place to contain a worst-case scenario.

The new rules include many recommendations made in a report Salazar released in May, including requirements that rigs certify that they have working blowout preventers and standards for cementing wells. The cement process and blowout preventer both failed to work as expected in the BP spill.

The April 20 spill, which was triggered by an explosion that killed 11 people, dumped an estimated 200 million gallons of oil in the Gulf. BP killed the well two weeks ago and expects to eventually pay at least $32 billion to handle the cleanup and damage claims.

Under the new rules, a professional engineer must independently inspect and certify each stage of the drilling process. Blowout preventers — the emergency cutoff equipment designed to contain a major spill — must be independently certified and capable of severing the drill pipe under severe pressure.

RELATED: One person missing as another oil rig explodes in the Gulf of Mexico

Companies also will be required to develop comprehensive plans to manage risks and improve workplace safety.

Todd Hornbeck, CEO of Covington, La.-based Hornbeck Offshore Services, said lifting the moratorium would leave the industry in a “de facto moratorium stage” until the government fully explains how new drilling permits will be issued.

“We’re still in the dark,” said Hornbeck, who heads up one of the companies that sued to block Interior’s initial moratorium. His company provides vessels and other services for the offshore industry.

“The devil is in the details, as they say, and the industry hasn’t seen the final requirements for what we would have to do to be able to actually get a permit issued,” he added. “Until that is done, lifting the moratorium may be just a moot or perfunctory act. … Right now, I’m skeptical that it will be anytime soon that permits will be issued even if the moratorium is lifted.”

Billy Nungesser, president of the Plaquemines, La., parish and outspoken critic of the moratorium, said lifting the ban “would be great news. At a time when the future is still uncertain on how quickly the fishing and shrimping and all will come back, we could use some good news.”

Louisiana Sen. Mary Landrieu, a Democrat, has blocked a Senate vote to confirm President Barack Obama‘s choice of Jacob Lew to head the Office of Management and Budget until the moratorium is lifted or significantly eased.

Share this post on Facebook! CLICK HERE:

Also On News One: