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Known as “colorectal adenomas,” these polyps typically can be removed after being identified during a colorectal cancer screening, such as a colonoscopy.

The recurrence of such polyps, however, seems to be greater among men (but not women) who are relatively less active. The researchers looked at activity levels among more than 1,700 men and women, and found that the more leisurely the men’s lifestyle, the greater their risk for precancerous polyps.

Men who spent 11 or more hours a day in seated endeavors — such as writing or reading — were 45 percent more likely to develop polyps than those who spent less than seven hours a day engaged in sedentary behavior.

READ: A Simple Test For Colon Cancer?

The study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the U.S. National Cancer Institute, was schedule for presentation this week at the annual cancer-prevention conference of the American Association for Cancer Research, held in Oxon Hill, Md.

“Sedentary behavior is emerging as a risk factor for poor health,” study author Christine Sardo Molmenti, a postdoctoral research fellow in the department of epidemiology at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, said in a conference news release.

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