Top Ten Videos to watch

47th NAACP Image Awards Presented By TV One - Press Room
A Man Operating A Tv Camera
Maurice White
March2Justice
'News One Now' With Roland Martin Taping
Bill Cosby
Activists In Los Angeles Gather To Burn Likenesses Of The Confederate Flag
Flint Firebirds V Windsor Spitfires
CBC Message To America: Rep. Conyers Addresses The Damage Inflicted On Our Communities By Poverty, Mass Incarceration And Lack Of Economic Development
Iowa Caucus Ted Cruz
NewsOne Now NAACP Image Awards Preview
Student sitting at a desk in a classroom
Slavery Stock image
The 16th Annual Wall Street Project Gala Fundraising Reception
Ava DuVernay
Roland Martin Blasts Stacey Dash For Comments About BET, Black Networks
President Obama Delivers State Of The Union Address At U.S. Capitol
Ava DuVernay
2016 North American International Auto Show
Democratic National Committee Presidential Primary Debate
88th Oscars Nominations Announcement
Democratic debate
Dream Speech
GOP Presidential Candidates Debate In Charleston
US President Barack Obama speaks on the
24593149
2011 Winter TCA Tour - Day 5
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 18, 2015: Two wooden stand-in Oscar statuettes are ready to be taken on
Woman Holding Dollars - Isolated
Leave a comment

 hoodbooks

I just finished reading True To the Game  by Teri Woods (I’m know-I’m super late) and I liked it. For my money, it was better than Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury and anything that I’ve read by James Joyce including (and especially) Ulysses.

It wasn’t better, however, than Omar Tyree’s Flyy Girl, Vickie M. Stringer’s Let That Be the Reason, Donald Goines’ White Man’s Justice, Black Man’s Grief, or two of the greatest works of American literature over the course of the past 50 years-Sister Souljah’s The Coldest Winter Ever and Iceberg Slim’s Pimp: The Story of my life.

I get into an argument all the time with my friend, writer Akil Kamau who absolutely refuses to read hood books on the grounds that they’re beneath him. Akil believes that every Black writer has a responsibility to be either the next Carter G. Woodson or the next W. E. B. Du Bois. He told me that once, he found himself reading a hood book, started to enjoy it and put it down, ashamed.

I was like, “Dude, you shoulda just finished it!”

He was like, “I couldn’t. What if I actually… liked it?”

One of the mistakes I think we make or that can be made is to think that every Black writer is a hood book writer. You guys are literate, I mean, you are reading now, so I’m sure you’ve seen either Usher or R Kelly or someone similar being referred to in a newspaper as a “rapper” and you’ve cringed.

Similarly, the idea of Toni Morrison as a hood book writer is horrifying. But is it insulting?

One thing I think to remember is that Shakespeare was, during his time at least, a populist writer. Writing was his hustle; he was just trying to get his plays put on to make some money.

By the same token, it’s easy then to imagine that one of these young talents we disparage as “hood writers” or “street novelist”; the populists of our time, could go on to have a mark as lasting and definitive as Shakespeare’s.

Or is it all garbage, you tell me?

Also On News One: