LMPD

If racism is a public health crisis, then the Louisville Metro Police Department is a tumor. And a tumor can't cure itself.

Across the United States demonstrators held rallies to honor the life and legacy of Breonna Taylor, a Black 26-year-old Louisville, Kentucky, woman who was killed by police in her home.

Taylor's death exemplifies what happens to Black women who are routinely caught in the crossfires of the war on drugs, riddled with restricted access to their reproductive and civil rights under the pervasive umbrella of systemic racism.

The billboard was unveiled as part of a week of action leading up to Taylor's death anniversary on March 13. Community members will be able to interact with the billboard as it travels through Louisville throughout the weekend.

Tamika Palmer says she will not give up on gaining justice for her daughter as the 1-year anniversary of Breonna Taylor's death inches closer.

The charges, assault and attempted murder of an officer, were dismissed without prejudice, barring any attempt to charge him in connection to the night of March 13, 2020.

The Kentucky Prosecutors Advisory Council claimed they had no authority during a vote on Friday.

In a new episode of Jay Ellis' podcast, "The Untold Story: Policing," the Daughtery-Burr family recounts their horrifying experience with the LMPD in October 2018.

A detailed report released on Thursday by the NAACP's Legal Defense fund provides facts and figures, while also calling for the appointment of a special prosecutor.