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The suspect in a deadly mass shooting at a shopping mall in El Paso, Texas, on Saturday was widely identified on the internet as a young white man whose social media activity showed support and sympathy for the president’s apparent white nationalist agenda. The name and photos of a man purported to be Patrick Crusius quickly circulated across Twitter in the hours after the shooting that first began outside a Walmart store at Cielo Vista Mall was first reported. If those reports were accurate, Crusius, allegedly a Texas native, just turned 21 last week.

Washington Examiner reporter Anna Giaritelli tweeted a photo of the suspect she said law enforcement identified as being Patrick Crusius.

While officials did not immediately announce the identity of the shooter, the Washington Examiner reported that “A law enforcement source in El Paso told the Washington Examiner that 21-year-old suspect Patrick Crusius from Dallas, Texas, has been taken into custody.”

A manifesto purportedly written by Crusius, perhaps even in the hours before the shooting attack that according to one report killed at least 15 people, was left behind. Pages of the manifesto reportedly included anti-immigrant rhetoric with the author going into depth on why he is “against race mixing,” supports the idea to “send them back” and offering a prediction of “genocide.”

Social media accounts allegedly belonging to Crusius were reportedly scrubbed in the hours before the attack at a mall.

But at least one tweet, apparently preserved by someone controlling an Antifa Twitter account, seemed to show he was in support of building President Donald Trump‘s wall along the nation’s southern border.

The El Paso shooting was the second mass shooting in as many weeks reportedly attributed to white supremacists. Just last week, Santino William Legan killed multiple people attending the Garlic Festival in Gilroy, California. That shooting and Saturday’s shooting in El Paso were the latest in a growing string of attempted and carried-out mass shootings attributed to overt pro-white racism that has soared since Trump was elected.

Similar to reports about Saturday’s shooter, Legan left behind social media posts that show he may have been a white supremacist or at least sympathized with the racist movement. The final social media post Legan made prior to the July 28 shooting endorsed a book that has been widely tied to white supremacist hate groups and ideology.

“Why overcrowd towns and pave more open space to cater to make room for hordes of mestizos and Silicon Valley white twats?” Legan wrote on a post to his now-deleted Instagram account before plugging the text “Might Is Right” by Ragnar Redbeard.

“Might Is Right” has been banned in multiple countries and essentially advocates for social Darwinism, or the idea that members of certain races or ethnicities are inherently better equipped for survival than others. Though the true author of the book is unknown, it first appeared in the 19th century and argued that the “white race” was biologically superior.

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