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Noname

Source: Ryan Muir / The FADER

Artist Noname is the self-proclaimed “hood librarian” opening a free library called the Book Club. Her radical hood library provides books and other resources to the local community of Chicago.

The rapper and activist believes the only way to eradicate the violence of colonization is by studying and practicing. Noname started her book club in 2019 to highlight voices of color and those from the LGBTQ+ community. Her efforts helped to spread awareness of texts discussing progressive topics such as oppression, political resistance, social justice, capitalism and more.

Noname’s book club is a community-driven initiative, which also encourages readers to support locally-owned bookstores owned by people of color. Her website provides a directory of locations across the country.

The radical artist even created a day referred to as National F*ck Amazon Day, also known as Library Card Registration Day, where club members are encouraged to divest from Amazon by signing up for a free library card.

With nearly 200k followers on Twitter, Noname’s book club has partnerships with libraries in her hometown of Chicago, Los Angeles, New York and Oakland. The club continues to grow with its official headquarters opening this month. The library is completely free, and Noname has started a Patreon, where supporters can donate a dollar a month to keep the storefront open.

Noname is following in the footsteps of her mother Desiree Sanders, who opened Afrocentric Bookstore in Chicago. The bookstore opened in June 1990 to provide Black people with books that focused on Black stories. Sanders opened the store for profit out of a necessity to survive under a capitalistic society. Noname is happily changing that narrative by offering the same resources for free.

Be sure to check out the work Noname is doing for the community and support the cause by sharing the story or donating to her book club here.

Literacy rates among black students in the U.S. are alarming. According to a 2019 study by the NAEP, just 15% of Black 8th graders were at or above reading “proficiency,” and about half didn’t even reach the “basic” reading benchmark. Literacy is an amazing weapon to fight against poverty. It also promotes learning, which can open up the world for a child with the right opportunities.

SEE ALSO:

Children’s Book Inspired By ‘The 1619 Project’ To Hit Shelves This Fall

5 Books Addressing Race That Every Teen Should Read

National Read A Book Day: 15 Acclaimed And Unapologetically Black Authors

50 Books Every Black Teen Should Read
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Rapper And Activist Noname Has A Free Bookstore In Chicago — Her Website Also Has A Black Directory  was originally published on globalgrind.com

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