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West Coast Legends hip-hop

Source: General / Radio One

Snoop Dogg, E-40, Too $hort, and Ice Cube could each rightfully claim the title of King of West Coast Rap. Instead, they decided to form a supergroup and reign on the throne together under the mountainous moniker, Mount Westmore.

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Formed in 2020 during the pandemic, all four rap pioneers have finally made it around to dropping their debut group album, aptly titled Snoop, Cube, 40, $hort. The projected release date is set for December 9th.

We got a chance to preview a few songs off the upcoming LP during a virtual Q&A, which unfortunately didn’t include Uncle Snoop as he was stuck on location shooting a movie. Still, even being in the digital presence of Cube, E-40, and Too $hort while all together gave off enough energy to set the tone for what’s sure to be an epic meeting of the masters on wax.

 

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The songs previewed on the call were “Lace You Up,” “Motto” “Up & Down,” previously-heard lead single “Too Big” and explicit-heavy standout “Have A Nice Day.” Each track incorporates the G-Funk sound that’s become synonymous with West Coast hip-hop, but they still come off as fresh production-wise in regards to 2022 standards. However, this is just the beginning of what Cube confirmed will be an ongoing effort from all parties involved. In short, Mount Westmore is here to stay!

Being that we are still in Hip-Hop History Month, it was only right to ask the fellas a question that relates to the occasion at hand: In forming a supergroup consisting of certified hip-hop pioneers, what’s the greatest advancement each of these men have seen in the rap game since individually starting?

Take a look below to see what Cube, 40, and Short had to say on the evolution of hip-hop from the perspective of three certified rap pioneers, and check for their debut album as Mount Westmore to arrive on December 9:

 

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The Evolution Of Hip-Hop From The Perspective Of Three Certified Rap Pioneers  was originally published on blackamericaweb.com

1. ICE CUBE ON THE BIGGEST ADVANCEMENT IN HIP-HOP:

ICE CUBE ON THE BIGGEST ADVANCEMENT IN HIP-HOP: Source:Getty

“The entrepreneurial spirit that [hip-hop] provokes in the people that participate in it, and hopefully just the people that watch it and are fans. Before it was all about, ‘Grow up, go to college; get a job. Grow up, go to college; get a job’ — I think hip-hop, in general, has shown that you don’t always have to do it like that to be successful. You can be an entrepreneur.

You don’t have to go into hip-hop. Whatever you do, be a boss. That’s one of the jewels that’s given to our people. Everybody want to be a boss and not just go be a worker. [Hip-hop] is the start of us digging ourselves out [the mold] by figuring out what we do best and what’s our talent. It might be a service or a skill, but whatever it is just try to own it, make money and be your own boss with it. 

I think [entrepreneurship] is a real good thing that hip-hop has brought to our people since day 1 when we saw people putting out independent records. E-40, Too $hort —they were bosses before they were superstars.

…they were bosses before they were superstars — I’ll say that again!”

[sic]

2. E-40 ON THE GREATEST QUALITY HE SEES IN TODAY’S HIP-HOP:

E-40 ON THE GREATEST QUALITY HE SEES IN TODAY'S HIP-HOP: Source:Getty

“A lot of times, it’s a catch-23 instead of a catch-22 the first time you sign to a major as an independent artist. No matter what kind of deal you sign — 360, joint venture, distribution, 64/40, or whatever it is — if that major label puts the house behind you and you come with that big hit, and you’re young, it can help. You [begin getting] side hustle money, from shows and endorsements to everybody throwing money at you for commercials. Independently, you can go through Distrokid, CDBaby, TuneCore, and so many different other places nowadays. 

When we made “Captain Save a Hoe,” we had no idea that it was able to be on the radio. We just made it as an anthem for the streets, but the radio stations came to us like, ‘Y’all need to make a clean version!’ Say less — I called it, “Captain Save Them Thoe.” You can have a ghetto anthem out there and turn it into a radio song quick! Overall, I like how the youngsters [in hip-hop] know their worth. They playing boss positions now.”

[sic]

3. TOO $HORT ON HOW HIP-HOP HISTORY INCORPORATES INTO THE NEW MOUNT WESTMORE ALBUM:

TOO $HORT ON HOW HIP-HOP HISTORY INCORPORATES INTO THE NEW MOUNT WESTMORE ALBUM: Source:Getty

“If you play the album in its entirety, it kind of goes along with all of our careers. Each one of us has a different style, even if it’s just different subjects we touch on or production. Fans will tell you they learned a lot listening to E-40 all of their lives, as well as [listening to] Too $hort and Ice Cube or bumping Snoop Dogg. Just like all of our careers, the album as a whole will teach you a few things, remind you of a few and even educate while motivating.”

[sic]

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