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Last week’s attack at the Capitol did not go unnoticed by the millions of Black people who watched those domestic terrorists evade culpability for their parade of white rage and violence.

In the days following, a growing number of members of the mob have met their consequences, detained and arrested over the complicit participation in one of the most shocking displays of treasonous cowardice in American history.

Social media users are composing detailed threads that show videos of certain mob members being promptly escorted straight to jail.

Federal law enforcement officials are bringing forth charges and actively searching for those who can be identified using social media videos and have also launched a murder probe into the death of Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick, who was bludgeoned with a fire extinguisher. He suffered cardiac arrest in his last moments and was possibly exposed to a chemical agent, according to Fox 5 DC. A second officer committed suicide in the wake of the attacks.

According to a recently published story in the Associated Press, at least 90 people have been arrested from the violent mob comprised of mostly white supremacists and nationalists. The group assembled in Washington to contest the Electoral College vote, which weeks earlier proclaimed Joe Biden the winner of the 2020 presidential election. Their intent was to invoke violence and even death in the name of their leader Trump, who urged them to march to the Capitol.

The pro-Trump extremists stormed the Capitol calling for “the hanging of Vice President Mike Pence,” the new target of Trump’s rage before his social media accounts were shuttered. AP reporters also uncovered death threat warnings issued towards Speaker Pelosi and urges to mask their appearances by using Blackface, issuing wrongly worded elements of a sacred Muslim prayer.

Police also recovered pipe bombs, assault rifles and ammunition in close proximity to the Capitol.

But it goes without saying that true confusion relayed over the officer’s capability in using restraint in terms of the mob, the same group of people who override the call of the Black Lives Matter movement with “Blue Likes Matter,” or “All Lives Matter.”

1. Riley Williams

Williams, a member of the Capitol rioters, was arrested on Jan. 18 after she was accused by a former lover of stealing Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s laptop or hard drive with intent to sell it to Russians. Williams, 22, was charged with entering a restricted building and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, the New York Post reports. FBI authorities are investigating the claims that she stole machinery from Pelosi’s office.

2. Larry Rendall Brock Jr., retired Air Force officer

Brock, 53, was arrested on Jan. 10 in Texas over his participation in the Capitol attack. He was charged with is charged with knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds. However, according to the AP a judge ordered him to home confinement on Thursday even though prosecutors pointed to Brock’s intent to take hostages during the raid after he was discovered with zip-ties and handcuffs on his person.

3. Christine Priola, former school therapist

Priola, a 49-year-old former occupational therapist from Cleveland was arrested on charges of knowingly entering or remaining in a restricted building, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, and unlawful activities on Capitol grounds, according to WKYC. She was placed on electronic home monitoring and is not permitted to travel. 

4. Kevin and Hunter Seefried

Kevin Seefried along with his son Hunter turned themselves in to authorities in Delaware on Thursday after the FBI received a tip of their participation at the Jan. 6 mob attack. According to The New York Times federal agents were tipped off by one of Hunter Seefried’s co-workers. The haunting images of Seefried carrying a Confederate flag through the halls of the Capitol reconfirmed to the public that there were explicit racist notions held within the participants of the attack. The Seefrieds face one count each of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and depredation of government property, Yahoo News reports.

5. Robert Sanford, retired firefighter

Sanford a retired former firefighter was arrested on Jan. 14 and charged with three felony charges including assaulting a police officer, The Wall Street Journal reports. Video of him hauling a fire extinguisher at police made its rounds on social media. His arrest is not related to the death of Officer Brian Sicknick who was bludgeoned to death during the mob attack.

6. Jacob Fracker and Thomas Robertson, North Carolina police officers

Fracker and Robertson, two off-duty cops from Rocky Mount, North Carolina, were charged with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, USA Today reports. They were arrested on Jan. 13 after social media posts pointed to their participation in the insurrection.

7. Nick Ochs, Proud Boys Leader

Ochs a leader of the Proud Boys Hawaii group was arrested on Jan. 7, after returning to Hawaii one day after storming the Capitol. He was released from jail on Jan. 11 and faces one count of unlawful entry into restricted buildings or grounds, KITV reports.

8. Aaron Mostofsky, son of Brooklyn Supreme Court Judge

Mostofsky, 34, was charged with four counts in the deadly Capitol attack, including  including theft of government property, illegal entry into a restricted area and disorderly conduct, according to the New York Post.

9. Richard Barnett

Barnett of Arkansas faces federal charges of entering a restricted building without lawful authority while carrying a dangerous weapon, which carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, reports WREG. Barnett, 60, is also charged with stealing public property and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.

10. Adam Johnson

Johnson, 36, of Florida, “was charged with one count of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; one count of theft of government property; and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds,” according to the FBI. He was arrested on Jan. 8. 

11. Jacob Anthony Chansley, a.k.a. “Jake Angeli”

Chansley was taken into custody on Jan. 9, becoming one of the most disturbing faces of the mob attack at the Capitol. He was charged with knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, and with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, according to the FBI. He was indicted on six counts relating to the attack. Much controversy remains around the fact that he was granted organic meals after his mother complained about his food restrictions.

12. Doug Jensen, mason worker

Doug Jensen, 41, of Des Moines, Iowa was arrested on Jan. 9, the Des Moines Register reports. He faces five federal charges including: knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority, disrupting the orderly conduct of government business, violent entry and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building, parading, demonstrating or picketing in a Capitol building, obstructing a law enforcement officer during a civil disorder. Jensen was also let go from his job at Forrest & Associate Masonry.

13. Derrick Evans, West Virginia lawmaker

After recently being sworn into office, Evans resigned as a West Virginia delegate on Jan. 11, days after it was revealed he was part of the Capitol Hill insurrection. Evans, 35, is charged with one count of knowingly entering or remaining in any restricted building or grounds without lawful authority; and one count of violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol Grounds, according to an FBI release.

14. Placed on “No-Fly” List

15. Placed on “No-Fly” List

16. Placed on “No-Fly” List

17. Placed on “No-Fly” List

18. Placed on “No-Fly” List

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