First Lady Michelle Obama

Former first lady Michelle Obama and Penguin Random House have launched a scholarship award for young aspiring writers.

Our current President reportedly doesn't even get his wife a present for Christmas.

Like most Black women in their 50s who have been blessed with youthful looks, Michelle Obama barely looks a day over 30. Watch her transform from a young girl from Chicago's South Side to the First Lady of these United States!

First lady Michelle Obama turned her last speech before leaving the White House into a powerful and emotionally stirring message for young people amid growing fears among marginalized communities of President-elect Donald Trump and his cabinet heading to the nation's capital.

Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama may be everything for most Black women but she means all that much more to the young girls and grown-ass women from her native South Side of Chicago; Harlem, New York; Southeast DC; North Philly; South Central L.A. and all the hoods in-between.

In her final White House interview with Oprah Winfrey, First Lady Michelle Obama spoke in-depth about the racial antipathy in America that led her to being labeled an "angry Black woman."

Veronica Chambers, editor of a new anthology on Michelle Obama, opens up on our first African American FLOTUS and what her very being means to us—and this country.

Will history judge Barack Obama as the most successful Commander-in-Chief?

President Obama says his daughters, Sasha and Malia Obama, are “ready to get out of the nest. We don’t think they’re ready, but they certainly think they’re ready.”

On November 4, 2008, Black women hit the main stage. And with Barack Obama’s inauguration that January, America would be required to stare in the face of what it had hated for centuries. It would have to recognize Black leadership, Black intelligence, Black beauty and Black love.

Allison Samuels, an award-winning journalist and senior writer for The Daily Beast, reflects on what First Lady Michelle Obama's deep complexion says to Blacks—and the world.

#OneObama is our commemoration of the Obama presidency—looking back at the highs and the lows, reflecting on his impact as both cultural figure and political leader, what his policies meant to real people, as well as inviting our readers to share their thoughts on the end of this historic administration.