Senate

Reversing course, Senate Democrats grudgingly accepted embattled Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich‘s hand-selected Senate appointee, Roland Burris, as they sought to break an impasse over President-elect Barack Obama‘s former seat.

President-elect Barack Obama‘s proposed tax cuts ran into opposition Thursday from senators in his own party who said they wouldn’t do much to stimulate the economy or create jobs.

The state Canvassing Board was posed to certify the results of the recount in Minnesota‘s grueling Senate election in Al Franken’s favor — but that doesn’t mean the race is definitely over.

Illinois U.S. Senate appointee Roland Burris plans to have a high-stakes showdown on Capitol Hill this week with Democratic leaders who continue to say he won’t be seated in Congress.

From Ben Smith at Politico: While Roland Burris may be appointed to Obama's Senate seat, he might have had a hard time finding a place in an Obama White House.

President-elect Barack Obama‘s transition office is ready to release an internal review of all contacts his staff had with Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich’s office over the Senate seat that Obama has vacated and that the governor is accused of putting up for sale.

Republicans and Democrats alike are calling for Illinois lawmakers to begin impeachment proceedings against Gov. Rod Blagojevich, saying the step is necessary to restore public confidence in state government.

With Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich defying calls for his resignation, state officials pondered reducing his power or forcing him from office amid an intensifying criminal investigation that has made him arguably the most toxic politician in America.

Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich could still appoint someone to fill Barack Obama‘s U.S. Senate seat despite charges that he tried to barter it away for cash or a plum job in what prosecutors call “a political corruption crime spree.”

A bipartisan group of auto-state senators reached a last-ditch compromise Thursday to throw Detroit’s Big Three a government lifeline worth billions, but the plan faces an uphill battle in a reluctant Senate.