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Americans are rightly frustrated that government leaders who were elected to serve them instead pushed through a $900 billion stimulus package which would only provide direct payments of $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples.

A new poll shows that while most Americans across the aisle agree that relief is needed to combat the fallout of the coronavirus, the majority say the allotted amount is not enough.

Thirty-one percent of voters said up to $600 per person is the right amount of support, while 54 percent of Democrats and 43 percent of Republicans said the stimulus checks aren’t enough, according to Morning Consult/Politico polling.

Researchers polled 1,995 registered voters from Dec. 18-20 to gather data.

While the bill made headway through Congress, Donald Trump, in an unforeseen turn of events, threatened to veto the bill, urging legislators to amp up the amount and eliminate “wasteful and unnecessary” items from the legislation. Congressional leaders want Trump to move forward, with the promise that more relief is on the way. Trump has until Monday to sign the bill.

However, there may be enough support to override Trump if he does decide to veto.

After months of stalling, Congress rallied around a bill that saw a series of false starts around the early fall, specifically after Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said it was more pertinent to focus on the presidential election and the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett, who is now a Supreme Court Justice.

After Trump’s announcement, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she was willing to work to secure $2,000 per individual, which is the amount Democrats claim they originally suggested and the amount Trump suggested Tuesday night.

“Republicans repeatedly refused to say what amount the President wanted for direct checks,” Pelosi tweeted. “At last, the President has agreed to $2,000 — Democrats are ready to bring this to the Floor this week by unanimous consent. Let’s do it!”

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer chimed in and echoed Pelosi’s sentiments, but also urged Trump to sign the current bill.

“We spent months trying to secure $2,000 checks but Republicans blocked it,” he wrote. “Trump needs to sign the bill to help people and keep the government open and we’re glad to pass more aid Americans need. Maybe Trump can finally make himself useful and get Republicans not to block it again.”

If Trump vetoes the bill, that would mean a full stop of $1.4 trillion to fund government agencies through September as well as money for transit systems in deficit, an increase in food stamp benefits and $4 billion in assistance to other countries to provide a COVID-19 vaccine.

SEE ALSO:

Trump Threatened To Veto The Stimulus Package. So When Will Checks Arrive? Who Gets Them? How Much? Coronavirus Money Questions Answered

Biden’s Coronavirus Task Force Is A Good Start, But Here’s What Else Is Needed To Close The Racial Covid Gap

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