Voting Rights Act

Our vote determines the fate of legislation in your state and across the nation. Your vote protects the interests of your neighbors, your families, and the promise of a healthier democracy.

The VRA gave us the power to protect, access, and shape our democracy. We must use it today to build the multi-racial broad-based popular democracy we all need to protect our future and planet.

We’ve got plenty of progress to celebrate today – and a clearer path forward for future generations. 

The move comes following the county's decision to adopt a new map after data was published about Black and Brown population growth in the 2020 Census.

From the movements of the 1960s to the evolution of progressive culture today, college-aged individuals have been one of the main groups energizing the quest for change.

On Aug. 6, 1965, with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by his side, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act.

A well-respected expert in election administration and voting rights, Ms. Helen Butler, testified at Monday's Senate hearing about her removal from the Morgan County Board of Elections and the repercussions of Republican attempts to assert partisan control over election administration.

All but six Republicans voted against advancing a bill that would create an independent commission to study the U.S. Capitol attack, using the procedural mechanism known as the filibuster to end the bill's discussion.

Some Congressional Black Caucus members believe that voting rights should be prioritized alongside broader election reform legislation.

The anniversary of the 15th Amendment is a good time to recommit to protecting democracy and ensuring ballot access for all.

Brian Kemp used dirty tricks to suppress the Black vote.

A federal judge rejected Brian Kemp's request to completely reject absentee ballots over mismatched signatures.